Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Winter 2019 Issue of Ripples



From the Editor

By Stephen Sapp

Does it strike anybody else as strange that by the time it gets to feel like “real” winter in Northern Virginia, the days are already getting noticeably longer? I suppose I shouldn’t complain, though, because despite the frigid temperatures and sporadic bouts with snow and the dreaded “wintry mix, the longer days mean that spring can’t be that far off! Of course, we can expect some more cold weather and snow before then so be sure to stay current in your preparations for those possibilities!

Please check out the articles in this issue of Ripples to stay up to date on what’s going on in our community.

As always, we welcome your comments and responses (ssapp@miami.edu).

(Thanks to Tom Barry for the photo at the top. The one to the right is from our deck—remember that our birds appreciate all the help they can get during the cold months of the year!)

Message from the President of Lakeport Cluster

By Mary M. Sapp

As we start the new year I want to pause and look back at last year. For Lakeport, 2018 was the year of the dock. Responses from residents and visitors who walk by our new dock via the RA path have been very positive. If you have not yet spent time sitting on the new benches and enjoying the view, I urge you to do so (on a nice day, of course!).

In 2018 Lakeport also undertook a number of landscaping projects, which will continue to be a priority going forward. The new dock required transplanting before the excavator arrived, post-construction repairs to areas damaged by the excavator, and the addition of new landscaping along the shoreline. We also removed the Japanese holly hedge along the path by the Safeway wall that had been ruined by canker, installed new landscaping in Triangle Park, and contracted for new four trees and 16 bushes on Lakespray Way, most of which have already been installed. And then of course there were the trees. We did two rounds of professional tree-trimming/removal last year (24 trees), and Paul Renard removed an additional 15 small dead trees. Our master list of trees that need attention has shrunk considerably in the last two years, but we anticipate the need to do considerably more tree work this year and in the future as trees in our community reach the end of their natural life. Other landscaping projects planned for 2019 include new plants to replace the area now lying fallow across from the Safeway wall, additional landscaping on Lakespray, the insertion of plant “plugs” to help stabilize coir logs installed along the shoreline, first steps to address storm-water mitigation involving common property, and enhanced regular maintenance.

Last year the Board also addressed projects related to general maintenance, another priority that will continue this year. Replacement reserves were used to repair the bulkhead next to the dock, to replace lighting along the RA path (and to add two new lights to improve visibility on the section from the entrance to the dock), and for street repaving repairs. In addition, as mandated in our Reserve Study operating funds were used to paint curbs and parking spaces and for several electrical projects. To keep on top of smaller maintenance projects, we now have a Maintenance Committee, and the Board already has proposals to replace retaining walls in need of repair, the only item pending from the Reserve Study that needs to be addressed now.

These projects, plus recent repairs and replacements by owners on their own homes, all combine to make Lakeport a more attractive place to live. In response to last summer’s inspections, over half of Lakeport owners have completed repairs to their homes (including a number of major roofing and siding projects), and 15 additional owners are in the process of taking care of their items (the remaining 30% had no violations).

To help owners use state-of-the art and upscale materials and designs for these repairs, the Standards Committee was busy this past year obtaining DRB approval for new standards for siding, doors, roofs, and storm doors. And in January 2019 we gained approval for a revision to the 2018 version of the siding standard that removed a stipulation on party walls the DRB had inserted in an earlier review. We are continuing to revisit Lakeport’s other standards, only one of which had been updated since 2007.

It was gratifying to hear one of the DRB members reviewing our siding proposal in January comment that Lakeport is a beautiful community with premium quality homes and that DRB members consider it “one of the premier clusters” in Reston. The new dock, enhanced landscaping, and attention to maintenance (both in common areas and individual homes) all will help continue this reputation.

The quality of a community is more than just its physical appearance, however, and the Board is also committed to fostering a stronger sense of community. The Social Committee will build upon the success of last fall’s dock party via a similar community-wide party this spring and will continue Lakeport’s traditional Easter Egg Hunt and TGIFs. We also hope that the progressive dinner and Halloween bonfires held last year will become new Lakeport traditions throughout our cluster. Please plan to take advantage of these opportunities to get to know your neighbors better, which will enhance the quality of life for all of us.

Another way to build relationships and at the same time help make Lakeport a better place to live is through volunteering. There are a number of opportunities, including participating in a community work day, contributing to one of the social events, or serving on a Lakeport committee. Thanks to the growing number of individuals who helped out this past year (from planning the dock party to working on landscape cleanup, from chairing/serving on committees to shoveling snow for a neighbor). We look forward to seeing even more volunteers in 2019.

Happy New Year!

Landscape Committee

By Carol Leos

This has been a busy fall/early winter for the Landscape Committee, with the following projects completed (and more to come!):

  1. Triangle Park grass and plants have been enhanced after the path was repaired.
  2. Reston Association has reinforced the ground along the path with soil and seed to protect the path. 
  3. Trees at designated areas have been trimmed to protect residents, homes, and vehicles.
  4. Lakespray Way shrubbery has been continued for a more unified appearance (see the photo at right of 11 new skip laurels planted to shield the view of South Lakes Drive; more plants are scheduled for installation once the weather permits). 
  5. Plants that have died or been removed will be replaced as recommended by our landscape contractor.

Anyone who is interested in the care of our landscape is welcome to join the Landscape Committee. Also, if you have suggestions for needed landscape maintenance and/or enhancements, please communicate them to Landscape Committee chair Carol Leos at leosc1@aol.com.

Design Standards Committee

Reston Association’s Design Review Board (DRB) met in January to review three requested changes to Lakeport’s Siding Standard. Two of the proposed changes were approved:

  1. The earlier requirement that the interior of party walls be included in a HardiePlank project was removed. From now on, the way to deal with party walls (as well as the chimney, if it is shared) will be negotiated by neighbors. 
  2. HardiePlank colors are now specified: siding in Monterey Taupe and HardieTrim in Sailcloth. 

The third proposed change, to remove the requirement that all elevations be done at the same time, was not approved. So, as in the past, if an owner re-sides using HardiePlank (which is required if over 25% of the cedar siding is being replaced), the entire house will still need to be done (other than party walls and/or a shared chimney if the owner and neighbors decide to exclude any of those elements from the project).

The new siding standard is posted on the Lakeport web site at http://bit.ly/2FNmIZt. Note that if an owner decides to switch to HardiePlank, an application signed by at least three neighbors plus a Lakeport Board member must be submitted to the DRB. The application form, the new standard, and other Lakeport and RA standards can be found at http://www.lakeportcluster.org/p/cluster-standards.html. Owners should always consult this site before starting any replacement project.

The Board surveyed owners in fall 2018 about these proposed changes. Over half of Lakeport owners responded, and all three proposals received support from at least 85% of respondents. Thanks to all who participated in the survey—being able to share the results was very helpful at the DRB meeting.

Social Committee

By Diane Zoukis

The holiday lights are down, snow has covered the ground, and many of us are thinking of hibernating for the winter. As we reflect on the last few months, I want to recap some of the events that took place in the Lakeport community and look ahead to 2019!

We had an inaugural Halloween event where neighbors gathered outdoors around fire pits, some adults even donning costumes, to hand out treats to our youngest community members. One resident who participated provided this report: “Our end of the cluster had a fantastic time. We had four families come out with most in costume. We had a fire pit, tables with buckets of candy, a circle of chairs, a lighted ‘orb’ that kids had to touch before getting candy, and scary Halloween sounds playing. We estimated being visited by about 30 kids who I think loved the setup. It was a great social event among neighbors and everyone involved really enjoyed it. I think we created a new Halloween tradition and some advocated having more of these types of block parties.”

A holiday progressive dinner was held in the west end of our neighborhood that brought five families together to enjoy appetizers, main course, and dessert at rotating homes. We rounded out the evening singing Christmas carols around the piano beautifully played by Rich Rosenberg. In 2019, with advance planning, we hope to build on these events to include greater community participation.

It’s hard to imagine now, but spring is not that far off, and a community Block Party is already being planned. In addition, we intend to continue the traditional TGIF gatherings. If you are willing to host a TGIF by providing the venue (with guests asked to bring wine, beer, and/or an appetizer), if you’d like to join the Social Committee or organize the Annual Lakeport Easter Egg Hunt, or if you want to help with community events in any way, contact Diane Zoukis at dzoukis@msn.com.

Neighborhood Watch Update

By Chuck Foster

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-HElYzrxjEPo/U5XQGsrFfgI/AAAAAAAA6Lc/idxBgVWDeLE/s1600/NeighborhoodWatchSign.JPGThe Fairfax County Police Department (FCPD) is charged with serving our community. It might be helpful to get a better understanding of the department, given its importance to our safety and quality of life. To that end, we explore two documents that were recently published: the FCPD Officer Survey and the FCPD 5-year Strategic Staffing Plan.       

FCPD Officer Survey
Image result for photos of fairfax county police
The survey was independently conducted by the George Mason University Department of Criminology, Law and Society. At the time of the survey, there were 1,421 sworn officers eligible to participate. The response rate, at 71%, was considered high. The survey included 74 questions that covered the following topics:

  • Assessment of department goals and functions
  • Assessment of department strategies and programs
  • Job satisfaction
  • Salary/compensation
  • Promotional aspirations and job opportunities
  • Workplace climate
  • Officer preparedness
  • Assessment of department’s response to people experiencing mental health crisis
  • Perceptions of use-of-force training and policies
  • Perceived public support
  • Officer health and wellness
  • Officer demographics and other characteristics

What follows is some of the information revealed by the survey (percentages are rounded for brevity):

  • The officer corps is primarily male (86%) and white (82%). Only 12% are 50 years of age or older. Fifty-two percent have a bachelor’s degree and 14% have an associate’s degree. Eighteen percent reported being proficient in a language other than English. Interestingly, only 26% are residents of Fairfax County. 
  • Respondents had a positive assessment of the department’s ability to meet goals, such as preventing crime, solving major crimes, and handling people suffering a mental health crisis. Officers also gave very high marks for their preparedness to handle different types of people effectively, such as juveniles, the elderly, undocumented immigrants, racial and ethnic minorities, and people under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
  • Respondents gave high marks for their understanding of the department’s use-of-force policy and their ability to comply with it. 
  • Officers feel they have solid support from the community overall but less so from minorities.
  • The survey’s most negative ratings were in the areas of workplace climate, management practices, compensation, potential for advancement, and internal affairs. In addition, respondents reported a good work/life balance but not enough sleep per night.

As “customers” of the FCPD, we should be highly encouraged by officers reporting that they are well prepared to achieve the goals of the department and to handle a wide variety of scenarios successfully. However, perceptions of poor internal leadership and uncompetitive compensation should be of concern given the impact on morale.           

The FCPD Officer Survey can be viewed at:
http://www.cebcp.org/wp-content/FCPDOfficerSurvey2018.pdf

FCPD 5-Year Strategic Staffing Plan
The department’s 5-year staffing plan is a comprehensive and detailed document spanning 83 pages. Future challenges noted in the plan include the opioid crisis, cyber-related crime, the growth in investigative complexity, urbanization, daytime population growth, and overall population growth. One particular challenge noted in the plan will be the continuing growth in the Tysons Corner area and the growth in the urban corridor leading to Dulles Airport, which is facilitated by the expansion of the Silver Line. The population of Fairfax County is expected to grow to 1.2 million by 2025.
The plan requests 163 additional uniformed officers and an additional 43 civilian positions. Bureaus requesting staffing increases include Administrative Support, Cyber and Forensics, Information Technology, Major Crimes, Media Relations, Operations Support, Organized Crime and Intelligence, Patrol, Planning and Research, and Resource Management.

The Patrol Bureau has the largest new headcount request at 113. Additional hires would be used to staff the new South County District Station, increase capacity for Community Outreach and Youth Education, implement a Training Relief Squad, and increase the size of the Tysons Urban Team. The plan discusses the challenges associated with serving a community experiencing significant “vertical growth” (multi-story buildings). The plan also discusses the unacceptably high amount of patrol resources that are being diverted to handle calls at and around the Reston Town Center.

It’s good to know that our county’s police department is carefully planning for the expected growth in the demand for police services over the next five years. It will be interesting to see how much of the requested resources receive funding.

The FCPD 5-Year Strategic Staffing Plan can be viewed at:
https://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/police/sites/police/files/assets/images/chief/reports/fcpd%205-year%20strategic%20staffing%20plan.pdf.

Book Club

By Barbara Khan, Coordinator

Want to join some of your neighbors and talk over a good book? Lakeport has an informal book club that is always open to new members. No master’s in literature is required, no homework assignments, just a lively, lighthearted discussion of the book the group reads.

BecomingHere are the upcoming selections:

Book: Becoming by Michelle Obama
Date: February 18, 7:00 PM
Place: Marcy’s house at 1999 Lakeport

Love and Other Consolation PrizesBook: Love and Other Consolation Prizes by Jamie Ford
Date: March 18, 7:00 PM
Place: Barbara’s house at 11125 Lakespray

Call Barbara Khan at 703-390-0506 or e-mail her at bskhan@att.net for further information.

Fairfax County Delays Decision on Reston Density

By Kevin Burke

Proposed 4.8 Million Square-Foot Reston
Gateway Expands Reston Town Center
On January 23, the Fairfax County Planning Commission met to hear community input on a proposal to increase residential density in the corridor along the Dulles Toll Road and Metro Silver Line in the Reston Planned Residential Community (Reston PRC) District. A large contingent of citizens opposed to the increase, including a representative of the Reston Association (RA), spoke against the zoning amendment. The Planning Commission eventually postponed a vote on whether to recommend the higher limits, and it will next meet on February 13 to debate and vote on a recommendation.

The Proposal and What It Means

In Virginia, local governments like the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors have rather limited authority to manage population growth and business development. However, the state government does allow local governments to manage a Comprehensive Master Plan that generally delineates the types of development (e.g., light industrial, residential, mixed use) allowed in specified areas and includes categories of residential development with limits on maximum populations. By amending this Comprehensive Master Plan, local governments can exercise some control over the manner and extent of both residential and business growth. As a result, amendments to the Comprehensive Master Plan have serious consequences for developers, business, government, and residents.

The area that comprises most of Reston is part of a special category of the Master Plan, called a Planned Residential Community. Within the geographic limits of the PRC, the County can maintain some additional controls over development.

The current residential density limit in the Reston PRC is 13 persons per acre. With a population in 2017 of about 63,000, Reston’s residential development will soon reach the limit of 81,195 individuals allowed by this cap, according to the County’s planning staff estimates. The staff is further concerned that if the near-term proposed developments are permitted to be built, the residential limit needed would be as great as14.5 persons per acre. If the limit is not increased, builders have the option of dropping their projects from the PRC and instead building within the much less restrictive general Master Plan for the County. This would seriously undermine the ability of the County to keep Reston’s unique planning directives in effect.

That is why the Planning Commission’s staff is considering increasing the limit to 15 persons per acre, which would accommodate projects already proposed and give a cushion for further development. This would create a residential population limit of over 93,000. County officials believe Reston would not approach this limit before 2050, allowing some time to address the inevitable pressures on transportation, education, public safety, the environment, and other amenities. In addition, the proposed increase in residential limits would be focused on the area between Sunset Hills Drive to the north and Sunrise Valley Drive to the south, but it would include the Reston Town Center and most of the village centers, like South Lakes Village Center.

Reston Association’s Opposition

Several citizen organizations, including RA, spoke against the increased density limits at the January 23rd meeting. RA remains concerned about residential development that would be allowed at the village centers, which could amount to 50 dwelling units per acre. In addition, RA fears that the necessary infrastructure and government services would not be provided to accommodate the growth in population. Although the Planning Commission does not have jurisdiction over roads, schools, public safety, environmental protection, or other community services, RA insists that the Planning Commission does have control over the timing of the approval of zoning amendments. As a result, RA believes that the Planning Commission should not approve the increased density until it has a “reasonable basis for knowing where or when funding” for needed infrastructure and services will be available.

What’s Next?

The Fairfax County Board of Supervisors controls the Planning Commission, which is an agency of the county government. As a result, the Planning Commission does not have the final say on the fate of the proposed amendment to the Reston PRC District. Instead, it makes a recommendation to the Board of Supervisors, which will decide to accept or reject the increase to the residential density limit at a public meeting, possibly as early as this March.


Alerts and Reminders

Image result for image for reminderSnow shoveling: As we continue to experience snowy weather, please remember that the sidewalk near a homeowner's property is the responsibility of that homeowner to shovel. We’d also like to encourage you to help your neighbors with their shoveling. Remember to be cautious while walking on snow/ice.

Frozen pipes: In past winters several Lakeport residents have had to deal with burst water pipes as a result of freezing temperatures. If you have not already done so, you should take steps to avoid this problem. It is also a good idea to arrange for a neighbor to have access to your home in case you are out of town in the event this (or some other emergency) arises.

Help keep our community clean and beautiful: We hope the new trash can in Triangle Park (provided in December by Reston Association) will encourage people who enjoy that area to throw away their trash when they leave. If people still forget to do that, please clean up after them when you go by (and if you’re comfortable doing so, please gently point out to anyone eating there that we now have a trash can where they can deposit their trash). It would also help the appearance of our community if all residents picked up trash anywhere you see it while you’re out walking. Also, if you notice overflowing trash from the new trash can or the one at South Lakes Village, please take a photo and forward it to the Board so we can pass it on to Reston Association or South Lakes Village management company.

If you see a dog walker who fails to pick up the dog’s waste, please remind the person that doggie bags are available at two stations on the walking path in Lakeport.

A suggestion to improve lighting in Lakeport: A well-lit community is one of the most basic measures we can take to ensure the safety of our residents and the security of our property. One way to further the goal of safe lighting is for residents to leave their lights on at night, especially those in end units with short pole lights, which according to long-time Lakeport residents used to be standard practice. This is of course voluntary, but doing this small thing would be a gracious contribution to the overall safety and attractiveness of our community.

You must replace any tree you remove. If you recently removed a tree (dead or alive) on your property, remember that RA requires that you replace it with another tree. Reston Association has several resources for finding a replacement tree: see the list of recommended small trees at https://www.reston.org/Parks,RecreationEvents/NatureEnvironmentalResources/EnvironmentalResources/RecommendedTrees/tabid/571/Default.aspx. In addition, you might want to review https://www.reston.org/Portals/3/2018%20PARKSREC/tree%20brcochure%20web%20FINAL%2018.pdf and https://www.reston.org/Parks,RecreationEvents/NatureEnvironmentalResources/NaturalResources/TreesinReston/TreesShrubGuidelines/tabid/569/Default.aspx

Regular trash collection: If your trash or recycling is not picked up by 2:00 p.m. on a scheduled collection day, please call ADS at 703-388-0500 (also imprinted on the outside of your trash bin if you forget the number).

Reporting Suspicious Activity. If you see suspicious activity, don’t confront anybody but  instead call the Fairfax County Police non-emergency number, 703-691-2131 (use this number also to report vandalism or another crime that has already occurred). The police request that even if you just have a “gut feeling” something is wrong you notify them with as many details as possible. It is helpful if you can also take photos unobtrusively. Police will be dispatched (or you may be able to a report over the phone). Also notify Lakeport’s Neighborhood Watch coordinator, Chuck Foster chuckfost@aol.com. Please pay special attention to suspicious activity or sounds near the Lakeport dock, in the woods, or at night.

Never Again Be Late Paying Your Quarterly Assessment: Please consider paying your quarterly assessments by direct deposit instead of sending a check or paying online (which incurs an extra fee). If you decide to switch to direct deposit, it means that you never have to worry about incurring late fees because you might forget to make the payment (currently $25 a month for every 30 days the payment is late). In addition to sparing yourself the worry and hassle of making the payments manually, you save the Board time spent reminding people who haven’t paid shortly before the end of the month as well as extra costs to the Association for processing and mailing quarterly statements. You can cancel the arrangement at any time if for some reason autopay doesn’t work out for you. Should you wish to take advantage of this convenient way to pay your Lakeport assessment fees, please follow the instructions for filling out and mailing the form at https://drive.google.com/file/d/1U_9xgrDVzZlOBoUG04XT2vlxmWa99C6q/view.

Update your contact information: Please go to the Lakeport Directory (https://drive.google.com/file/d/1JVDIUn_CJgQwpTDNlnDzPyokRt4SW4sL/view) and check the contact information listed there for you. If a correction is needed, send it to both news@lakeportcluster.org and aguerra@scs-management.com. If your home has renters, please also ask them to send their contact information to these two emails. BTW, remember that if you need to contact a neighbor or just forget someone’s name, you can always check this directory.

Questions for Management Company: If you have a question about inspections, we suggest you start with the Board (board@lakeportlcluster.org) because we are apt to be more aware of your property (and it saves a $10 charge for each phone call or email related to inspections). For questions about quarterly assessments or other questions for Select Community Services (SCS), contact our portfolio manager for Lakeport, Alvaro Guerra: aguerra@scs-management.com, 703-631-2003.

Thanks to Volunteers

Related imagePlease take time to thank your neighbors for their efforts to make Lakeport a better place to live. If you want to volunteer your time to help your community, please let the Board or a committee chair know—it’s a great way to get to know people.

Dock:

  • Anonymous donor – paying for two new benches on the dock
  • Paul Renard for picking up the benches and Paul, Erin Cloney, and helpers – installing the new benches on the dock

Landscape:

  • Carol Leos – chair of the Landscape Committee 
  • Diane Scott, Alison Yeloushan, and Carol Leos – identifying possible initial actions for storm-water mitigation involving common property
  • Paul Renard – removing a dead laurel and trimming another one by the dock.

Standards:

  • Kelly Driscoll – drafting the latest proposal for Lakeport’s siding standard approved in January

Social

  • Diane Zoukis – chair of the Social Committee and organizing a pilot progressive party for homes on the west side of Lakeport Way

Maintenance

  • Paul Renard – offering to chair a new Maintenance Committee and keeping dock clean
  • Annabelle Hammer – restocking doggie-bag stations and keeping dock clean

Other

  • Erin Cloney – attending a focus group organized by RA to discuss recommended changes to lakes-related resolutions and address other lake-related questions and sending a report to the Board
  • Chuck Foster – providing advice on how to deal with individuals congregating in wooded common areas (see the Alerts article for his advice)
  • James Pan – providing a report on the recent meeting of the Fairfax County Planning Commission to hear community input on proposal to increase residential density
  • Kevin Burke – monitoring density issues
  • Barbara Khan – coordinating the Lakeport Book Club
  • Carol Leos – welcoming new residents
  • Tom Barnett – maintaining the Lakeport website, online directory, and listserv for announcements and posting Ripples
  • Stephen Sapp – editing Ripples


Lakeport Board and Committee Chairs

Board of Directors

  • Mary Sapp, President
  • Paul Renard, Vice President 
  • Alison Yeloushan, Vice President
  • Kay Quam, Secretary
  • Kevin Burke, Treasurer 

Committees and Volunteers

  • Book Club – Barbara Kahn, Coordinator
  • Disaster Recovery Committee – Jerry Beiter, Chair
  • Landscape Committee – Carol Leos, Chair
  • Maintenance Committee – Paul Renard, Chair
  • Neighborhood Watch Committee – Chuck Foster, Chair
  • Social Committee – Diane Zoukis, Chair
  • Standards Committee – Kelly Driscoll, Chair 
  • Welcome Committee – Carol Leos, Chair 
  • Webmaster and Listserv Administrator – Tom Barnett
  • Editor of Ripples, our community newsletter – Stephen Sapp
  • Fill doggie-bag stations and keep community dock clean – Annabelle Hammer


Ripples Recipe: Baked Crispix Party Mix

Yields: 8 servings
Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 1 hour
Total time: 1 hour 15 minutes

Ingredients

  • 8 c. Crispix
  • ¼ c. butter
  • 1¼ tsp. seasoned salt
  • 1½ tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
  • Mini-pretzels, nuts, etc. (optional)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 250 degrees.
  2. Combine seasoned salt, Worcestershire, and melted butter in a small bowl. 
  3. Put Crispix and any other of the optional ingredients listed in a large ziplock bag. Pour butter mixture over the cereal inside the bag, seal the top, and shake until all the pieces are evenly coated.
  4. Spread the mixture evenly in a baking pan. Bake for 1 hour at 250 degrees, stirring every 15 minutes.  
  5. Spread on paper towels to cool, then store in an airtight container.

If you have a favorite recipe you would like to share with your Lakeport neighbors, please send it to Stephen Sapp at ssapp@miami.edu. Include as much commentary as you like, and be sure to send along a picture if possible.

Monday, November 12, 2018

Fall 2018 Issue of Ripples

Photograph courtesy of Paul Zink

Fall 2018 Issue of Ripples



Lakeport Board and Committee Chairs

Board of Directors
Mary Sapp, President
Paul Renard, Vice President
Alison Yeloushan, Vice President
Kay Quam, Secretary
Kevin Burke, Treasurer

Committees and Volunteers
Book Club – Linda Rosenberg, Coordinator
Disaster Recovery Committee – Jerry Beiter, Chair
Landscape Committee – Carol Leos, Chair
Maintenance Committee – Paul Renard, Chair
Neighborhood Watch Committee – Chuck Foster, Chair
Social Committee – Diane Zoukis, Chair
Standards Committee – Kelly Driscoll, Chair
Welcome Committee – Carol Leos, Chair
Webmaster and Listserv Administrator – Tom Barnett
Editor for Ripples, our community newsletter – Stephen Sapp
Fill doggie-bag stations and keep community dock clean – Annabelle Hammer

Social Committee

October’s dock party turned out to be a great community event that allowed residents both to appreciate the improvements to the dock and the area around it and also to enjoy time with one another. Thanks to MaryAnn Hoadley (along with Sandy Laeser and Karen Cook) for coordinating and setting up for the party and to those who brought dishes to share and helped out in various ways.

We’re happy that Diane Zoukis will be Lakeport’s new Social Committee chair. She is already setting up a Holiday Progressive Dinner for the two buildings at the west end of Lakeport and will be happy to support efforts of others who want to set up their own progressive dinner. If you like parties or are interested in getting to know your immediate neighbors better, why not volunteer to help organize a progressive dinner this holiday season for the residents in your building and the one next to you and/or volunteer to host one of the courses: drinks/appetizer, main course (or two people could co-host this course), or dessert?

Diane also intends to organize a community-wide “block party” next year. If you couldn’t make the party to celebrate the dock, be sure to plan to attend Lakeport’s 2019 Block Party. In addition, she plans to continue the traditional TGIF gatherings. If you are willing to host a TGIF by providing the venue (with guests asked to bring wine, beer, or an appetizer) or if you’d like to join the Social Committee, contact Diane at DZoukis@msn.com

The New Lakeport Dock


For years, Lakeport residents have been looking forward to our new dock, and it is now complete! Kayakers and paddleboarders, picnickers, casual loungers, and Canada geese have all been enjoying the new structure. Happily, the geese seem to have confined themselves mostly to the new floating dock section, which is MUCH easier to clean than the old dock. Dip a broom in the lake, scrub a bit, and voila.

We’re in the last stages of getting the dock lighting in place with the bollard replacements, and this year’s landscaping is complete. In the late spring of 2019, we will be inserting water plants into the biologs to continue our eco-friendly restoration of the shore line, and we are working with Reston Association to have a trash can installed and maintained. A design for two new benches has been created but installation will be postponed until spring to avoid the impact of this winter’s weather. RA finished their paving the of the path next to the dock in time for the dock party in early October. That grand opening party was a big success and an opportunity for the neighborhood to view and enjoy the project—many thanks to Mary Ann Hoadley and others for organizing and supporting the event.

It was a long haul, but the end result is a beautiful dock that was built within budget and will be a Lakeport asset for the next 50 years. Thank you to the dozens of people who made this all possible!


Ripples Recipe

Contributed by Mary Sapp

Tiramisu

  • 6 egg yolks
  • ¾ cup white sugar + 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 2/3 cup (whole) milk
  • 1¼ cups heavy whipping cream (no carrageenan, with at least 36% butterfat)
  • ¾ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 pound mascarpone cheese, room temperature
  • ¾ cup strong brewed coffee (or espresso), room temperature (make 1 cup in case you need more, or even 2 cups if you want to drink some!)
  • 6 tablespoons rum 
  • 2 (3-ounce) or one 7-ounce packages hard ladyfinger cookies (can order Balocco Savoiardi Ladyfingers through Amazon)  
  • 2 + 2 tablespoons (approximately) unsweetened cocoa powder

IMPORTANT: Make two days in advance so flavors meld in refrigerator, and allow two hours to assemble.

1. Make coffee and let cool. Take mascarpone from refrigerator to soften. In a small saucepan, whisk together egg yolks and ¾ cup sugar until well blended. Whisk in milk and cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until mixture boils (should take around 5-8 minutes). Boil gently for 1-2 minutes, remove from heat, and allow to cool slightly. Cover tightly and chill in refrigerator 1 hour, stirring every 15 minutes.

2. After an hour, whisk mascarpone into yolk mixture until smooth. In a medium bowl, use electric mixer to beat cream with vanilla and 2 teaspoons sugar until stiff peaks form. Then gently fold whipped cream into mascarpone until basically uniform.

3. In a flat container long enough to hold a ladyfinger (I used a small square Tupperware; a pie pan should also work), combine ¾ cup coffee and 6 tablespoons rum. Quickly dip ladyfingers (don’t split) in coffee mixture, turn over, quickly dip other side, and arrange one layer of soaked ladyfingers in bottom of a 7x11 inch dish (use just under half of first package since bottom of dish isn’t as wide as top). Spread half of mascarpone/whipped cream mixture over ladyfingers, then sift around 2 tablespoons cocoa over the top. Repeat, using rest of ladyfingers and mascarpone/whipped cream (but not the cocoa). Cover and refrigerate for two days (toothpicks with plastic wrap work well to cover). Shortly before serving, sift more cocoa over top until it’s covered. Consider adding shaved chocolate on top.

An Ode to Lakeport’s Old Dock

By Carol Leos


Our First Lakeport Dock
Circa 1981 to June 6, 2018
(with appreciation to Castro-Hollsworth, original builders)

From on our dock what thrills we have seen
We’ve launched boats, rafts, and plenty a canoe
We’ve had fishing parties, picnics, weddings, and a memorial (George’s), too
Fireworks on each 4th of July elicit the phrase “My oh my!”

Snow, rain, or sleet
Our dock stood strong
Never flinching under any throng
Leaves came, then they would go:
Spring green and autumn’s variety aglow

Now as it has been showing its age,
Our dock has come to its final stage
Let us take a rear view and show our appreciation
With a sincere, spirited
“Thank You”

And Our New Lakeport Dock
October 6, 2018, to ???????

Now, we celebrate our beautiful new dock
Let us joyfully take stock
As we anticipate the launching of boats, rafts, and many a canoe
Where we will have fishing, parties, and other events, too

Through every season
Enjoying all the weather
For any given reason
Even the birds of the goose feather!

May we all appreciate our Lakeport dock for years to come
As we have lots and lots and lots of fun!

Carol R. G. Leos (Lakeport resident since 1982)
October 6, 2018

Neighborhood Watch Update

By Chuck Foster

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-HElYzrxjEPo/U5XQGsrFfgI/AAAAAAAA6Lc/idxBgVWDeLE/s1600/NeighborhoodWatchSign.JPGWe all have experienced someone knocking on our door for various reasons. What are the laws that govern this activity? Let’s explore the topic! 

Chapter 31 of the Fairfax County Code of Ordinances addresses “Peddlers, Solicitors and Canvassers.” As defined in the Code, a canvasser is an opinion-sampler or a poll-taker who is being compensated or working for someone who is being compensated. A peddler carries merchandise and offers it for sale. A solicitor takes orders for goods or services for future delivery.

Summarizing, the following acts by peddlers, solicitors, and canvassers are prohibited:

  • Conducting activity without first obtaining a County license (with exceptions).
  • Failing, upon request, to exhibit a license to a prospective buyer.
  • Attempting to gain entry (i.e., ringing the doorbell or knocking on the door) if a residence displays a sign bearing the words “No Peddlers or Solicitors” or words of similar import.
  • Conducting activity prior to 9:00 a.m. and after 8:00 p.m.
  • Failing to disclose, upon request, the name of the peddler, solicitor, or canvasser and the name of the company.
  • Failing to provide, upon request, a written receipt.
  • Leading the public to believe that a license constitutes an approval or endorsement by the County. 

In the case of peddlers and solicitors, any vehicle used in the conduct of business must display the name and business address of the person or business using the vehicle.     

The Director of the Department of Consumer Affairs of Fairfax County is responsible for issuing licenses to peddlers, solicitors, and canvassers. The Director conducts applicant investigations to assess risks to the health, safety, and welfare of the public. Reasons for denial include any felony conviction over the prior five years and any conviction over the prior five years for a crime against a person or involving moral turpitude, such as those involving sexual conduct or narcotics. In addition, intentionally making false statements on an application will result in denial. There are a number of entities that do not require a County license, such as telephone solicitors who do not have a place of business in the state. However, these are not the typical people who show up on our front step. Interestingly, two entities are not considered peddlers, solicitors, or canvassers in the County Code: persons selling fresh farm products and persons selling newspaper subscriptions.

A County-issued license contains the following information: license number, name of applicant, photograph and thumbprint of the individual, kind of goods sold or services performed, name of employer, date of issuance and expiration date, and signature of the County Director. Any person who violates any provision of Chapter 31 will be guilty of a class 2 misdemeanor. 

Hopefully, this information will better prepare you to handle an encounter with a peddler, solicitor, or canvasser. If you feel that someone is not complying with the law, you can summon the police. You may end up doing a favor for the whole cluster.

From the Editor

By Stephen Sapp

Photograph courtesy of Karen Mattern
Fall has finally arrived in all its glory (and chill!) after a seemingly unending summer, and it has been a busy time around Lakeport Cluster! Articles in this issue of Ripples provide details on a number of the major happenings in recent months: our long-awaited community dock was completed, and a wonderful party was held to celebrate this milestone; Reston Association completed repaving the Red Loop Trail through our cluster, finishing the stretch past the dock that they had postponed until the end of the construction; new landscaping was installed on both sides of the dock; new bollard lights were recently installed; the worst sections of our streets have been repaved  as an interim measure until full repaving (after milling) is needed in a few years; and the curbs and speed bumps have been repainted, brightening the curb appeal (pun definitely intended!) of our homes.

Enjoy reading more about the above items, plus a number of others (including a recipe for tiramisu for the upcoming holidays). As always, we welcome your comments and responses (ssapp@miami.edu).

Reston Will Become More Urbanized along Sunrise Valley Drive

By Kevin Burke

In the previous edition of Ripples, we metaphorically strolled down Sunrise Valley Drive from Reston Parkway to Wiehle Avenue to check out the four residential and mixed-use developments that are underway. Since these are mostly residential buildings in an area originally envisioned as office and light industrial, there will be real impacts on government services (like schools, police, and transportation), property values, and the traffic patterns we all must navigate.

These four developments are miniscule, however, compared to the two major development projects at either end of this section of Sunrise Valley Drive. And to attempt to accommodate the growing traffic pressures, there is in the offing a major road project as well. To understand the changes that could most immediately affect Lakeport Cluster residents, we should return to our stroll along Sunrise Valley by beginning where we started last time:  at the corner of Reston Parkway and Sunrise Valley Drive. But this time we’ll begin on the western side of Reston Parkway.

The Fairfax County Board of Supervisors has focused population density increases on developments along the Dulles Access Roads, around the Reston Town Center and in the village centers, like South Lakes Village Center. To take advantage of this increased density, developers have proposed several large urban-like developments on the north side of the Dulles Access Roads, including the following:

  • Reston Gateway’s nine new buildings (three residential, two hotels, and four mixed-use office buildings) between the upcoming Reston Town Center Metro station and the W & OD Trail
  • Renaissance Centro’s 20-story condominium building, with about 120 units at 1801 Old Reston Avenue across the street from Reston Town Center, to replace the current 3-story office building.
  • A 2,100-unit residential and retail community to replace the office park at Isaac Newton Square just north of the Reston fire station on Wiehle Avenue.
  • Reston Station Promenade, which will replace two-story medical buildings, a Bank of America branch office, and some office condos at the corner of Sunset Hills Drive and Wiehle Avenue; this project will include four new high-rise buildings  (a 23-story hotel, a 14-story office building, and two residential towers).
  • 1906 Reston Metro Plaza building, under construction next to the Wiehle Avenue/Reston East Metro station, which will be a 15-story office building.

Although the urban-style development on the south side of the Dulles Corridor is not at the same scale or pace as that which is occurring north of the Access Roads, it will be picking up soon.

1. Reston Crescent and Reston Crossing
Starting our review once again at Sunrise Valley Drive and Reston Parkway, a large re-development, called Reston Crescent, is about to begin. Of course, it is designed to take advantage of the upcoming Reston Town Center Metro Station by adding both commercial and residential high-rises and mixed use buildings on land behind the two current six-story office buildings next to Sunrise Valley Drive. The plan is add six new buildings, including a 20-story tower that will incorporate a 200-room hotel, two 32-story office buildings close to the Metro station, and three mid-rise residential buildings. To accommodate these buildings, the developers will create an urban street grid that will have roads wide enough for car, bike, and pedestrian traffic. A third south-bound lane will be added to Reston Parkway to ease congestion caused by the development, which will have a Wegman’s grocery store. When finished, the Reston Crescent will add 1,721 residential units and 380,000 square feet of retail space. The developer will dedicate 8.5 acres of open space for parks, including the two current storm-water management ponds.

A different developer owns another14-acre site with two office buildings between the Reston Crescent and the Dulles Access Roads. The plan is to create a 1.9-million square foot mixed-used community called Reston Crossing. The current design for this site would have six new towers, three of which would be residential, built around a central park.

2. Extension of Soapstone Drive
Traveling east on Sunrise Valley Drive, we come to an important road project that should begin in a few years: a half-mile extension of Soapstone Drive from Sunrise Valley Drive to Sunset Hills Drive. This project will include a new bridge across the Dulles Access Roads and a new intersection at Sunset Hills Drive, where it terminates. The road will have three lanes (with one lane in each direction and a middle lane dedicated to left-turn-only traffic), a bicycle lane in each direction, and a pedestrian sidewalk on the west side and a “shared-use path” on the east side. Construction is slated for 2023, and the total cost is nearly $170 million.

3. Metro Commerce Center
Going past Soapstone Drive, Sunrise Valley Drive takes us to the Reston Commerce Center office park. This property, at the south entrance of the Wiehle Avenue Metro station, includes three six-story office buildings and a parking garage. But being adjacent to the Metro station entrance suggests the site will be extensively redeveloped. The owner plans to keep the current buildings but will demolish the surface parking area to provide room for three new high-rise buildings: a 24-story apartment building, a 22-story office building, and a 14-story hotel. The plan includes five pocket parks and a civic plaza. Redevelop-ment will add a seven-story apartment building at the corner of Wiehle Avenue and Sunrise Valley Drive.

These plans are subject to change, but it is clear that Reston’s urbanized corridor will include the southern half.

Thanks to Volunteers

Image result for thank you imagesPlease take time to thank your neighbors for their efforts to make Lakeport a better place to live. If you’d like to volunteer your time to help your community, please let the Board or a committee chair know—it’s a great way to get to know people.


Dock:

  • Paul Renard –coordinating the dock project
  • Paul Renard, Kristen Bobik, Dave Fleming, Joe Powers, Andy Powers, Diane Zoukis – installing coir logs
  • Pete Hatfield, Kevin Dandy, Jonathan Hammer, Kay Quam, Stephen Sapp – transplanting plants out of the way of the excavator
  • Don Nagley – helping clean path after dock completed

Landscape:

  • Karen Cook – landscape chair last summer; and her committee (Gail Pitches, Sandy Laeser, Diane Zoukis, Don Nagley) 
  • Carol Leos –chair of the Landscape Committee going forward
  • Marilyn Bursch – initiating and researching grant for storm-water mitigation 
  • Paul Renard – continuing to cut small dead trees on common areas 
  • Carol Leos, Don Nagley, Gail Pitches, Phong Nguyen – watering

Standards:

  • Kelly Driscoll – drafting the latest proposal for Lakeport’s siding standard
  • Chuck Foster – suggesting and researching possibility of a standard for a driveway ramp

Social:

  • MaryAnn Hoadley and committee (Liz Blankespoor, Kristen Bobik, Sandra Laeser, Diane Zoukis) – coordinating the dock party
  • Carol Leos – donating champagne for the dock party and sharing a poem at the party
  • Diane Zoukis – agreeing to chair the Social Committee

Maintenance:

  • Paul Renard – offering to chair a new Maintenance Committee
  • Gil and Liz Blankespoor – reporting graffiti on fence to police and removing it; and Chuck Foster for alerting us
  • Elena Simonenko – replacing light bulb at entrance
  • Annabelle Hammer – doggie-bag stations and keeping dock clean

Other Committees:

  • Barbara Khan and Linda Rosenberg – coordinating Lakeport Book Club
  • Carol Leos – welcoming new residents
  • Tom Barnett – Lakeport website and online directory, announcements, posting Ripples
  • Stephen Sapp – editing Ripples
  • Kevin Burke – monitoring density issues


Alerts and Reminders

Image result for image for reminderA Suggestion to Improve Lighting in Lakeport: A well-lit community is one of the most basic measures we can take to ensure the safety of our residents and our property. The Board has had new bollards installed and the streetlights brought into good working condition. One suggestion that has been made to further the goal of safe lighting is for residents to leave their lights on at night, especially those in end units with corner lights, which according to long-time Lakeport residents used to be standard practice. This is of course voluntary, but doing this small thing would be a gracious contribution to the overall safety and attractiveness of our community.


Inspection Status: If you have completed repairs identified as part of Lakeport’s annual inspections and haven’t notified the Board yet that your work is complete, please email Board president Mary Sapp at msapp@miami.edu to let her know. She’ll inform SCS for you.

Frozen pipes: In past winters several Lakeport residents have had to deal with burst water pipes as a result of freezing temperatures. If you have pipes that are vulnerable, you should take steps to avoid having to address the problem of broken pipes and potentially costly damage and repairs. It is also a good idea to arrange with a neighbor to have access to each other’s homes in case one or the other of you is out of town when this (or some other emergency) arises.

Holiday trash schedule: American Disposal Service will not be picking up trash on Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Christmas trees will be collected the first two weeks of January (no decorations, tinsel, or plastic bags, please). NOTE: Please do not dump your Christmas tree in the woods!

Regular trash collection: If your trash or recycling is not picked up by 2:00 p.m. on a scheduled collection day, please call ADS at 703-388-0500 (also imprinted on the outside of your trash bin if you forget the number).

Dog waste: If you see a dog walker who fails to pick up the dog’s waste, please remind the person that doggie bags are available at two stations on the walking path in Lakeport.

Never Again Be Late Paying Your Quarterly Assessment: Please consider paying your quarterly assessments by direct deposit instead of sending a check or paying online (which incurs an extra fee). If you decide to switch to direct deposit, it means that you never have to worry about incurring late fees because you might forget to make the payment (currently $25 a month for every 30 days the payment is late). In addition to sparing yourself the worry and hassle of making the payments manually, you save Lakeport Cluster Association over $36 a year in costs associated with having the management company mail your assessment notices, helping us keep expenses and therefore homeowners’ fees as low as possible, not to mention saving the Board time that has to be spent reminding people who haven’t paid that the end of the month is approaching. You can cancel the arrangement at any time if for some reason autopay doesn’t work out for you.

Should you wish to take advantage of this convenient way to pay your Lakeport assessment fees, please follow the instructions for filling out and mailing the form at https://drive.google.com/file/d/1U_9xgrDVzZlOBoUG04XT2vlxmWa99C6q/view.

Annual Report and Budget: The PowerPoint from Lakeport’s 2018 Annual Meeting  is posted at https://www.lakeportcluster.org/p/material-for-2018-annual-meeting.html. If you couldn’t attend, you can review information from the meeting there. A preliminary 2019 budget was presented at that meeting; final budgets will be mailed to owners by SCS before the end of the year.

Contact Information: Can’t remember a neighbor’s name? Remember most residents and owners are listed in Lakeport’s Directory (https://drive.google.com/file/d/1zeaG3zBxgVw7xkMbOOAbmCqAQ-NJ58fU/view; PW=lakespray). If you have a question for SCS, contact their portfolio manager for Lakeport, Alvaro Guerra: aguerra@scs-management.com, 703-631-2003.
And it’s a good idea while you’re there to check your own information and update it if there have been changes in your information. If a correction is needed, send it to both news@lakeportcluster.org and aguerra@scs-management.com. If your home has renters, please also ask them to send their contact information to these two emails.

Connie’s Quilt: We hope everyone has had a chance to enjoy this year’s art project, “Connie’s Quilt,” courtesy of the STEAM TEAM at South Lakes High School and sponsors (including Lakeport’s own James and Holly Pan). The many parts of this organic, kinetic sculpture represent “our societal fabric and the importance of connectivity between people. Connie’s Quilt sets out to dispel the myth of the ‘self-made man’ and identify the reality that nobody gets where they are without support from family and friends. Interdependence is crucial to the survival and prosperity of any community . . . . The rings of this artwork represent how every individual is connected.” This message is certainly relevant to our Lakeport community, and we hope it resonates with all of us during this holiday season.

Design Standards Committee

By Kelly Driscoll

Over the last year, several Lakeport design standards have been updated. Each of these started with a request to the Board and Design Standards Committee to allow something that was previously prohibited by the standards. For each significant change we’ve conducted online surveys to measure support for the proposed changes, and in general the results have shown that our neighborhood is usually open to making changes if they provide homeowners with more flexibility in their home improvement and maintenance projects.

Changes made this year include the following:

  • Front Doors – The new standard provides a variety of options instead of requiring that owners replace doors with the original design (which often requires a custom door).
  • Storm Doors – The old standard was abandoned to allow homeowners to install two-section self-storing storm doors at the front door, instead of just at a back door.
  • Roof/Shingles – The new standard specifies a higher quality architectural shingle (also referred to as dimensional shingles) in a single color for the whole neighborhood.

The most significant standard change was approved last year to allow HardiePlank to be installed on individual homes. Since then, we’ve learned that big changes like this will benefit from small, iterative improvements. As homeowners have begun projects to install HardiePlank on their homes, we’ve received feedback from those who are replacing their siding, from their adjacent neighbors, and from the Reston Design Review Board (DRB). With that in mind, the Board sent another survey to get feedback on some specific requirements related to HardiePlank installations. The goals of these changes are to provide flexibility, to reduce potential conflict related to party walls, and to establish clear guidance on HardiePlank colors so that standard colors can be used without incurring the additional cost of painting the HardiePlank, which also defeats one of its major advantages, namely, not having to be painted. 

1. Remove the requirement that the interior of party walls be included in a HardiePlank project. Instead the new language would leave it up to the two owners to work out if/when party walls would have HardiePlank installed, with the further stipulation that if two adjacent homes are sided with HardiePlank, the party wall between them must not be left as cedar. This should help minimize the impact to neighbors when homeowners install HardiePlank.

In the picture to the right, the highlighted wall is a party wall. Although most agree that the wall is most accurately viewed as the exterior wall of the house on the right, Reston considers it a shared responsibility of both neighbors. Our current standard actually classifies it as an interior party wall for the house on the LEFT and requires that if the homeowner on the left installs HardiePlank, that wall must be included in the project.

The stipulation has caused conflict between some neighbors considering HardiePlank installations and dissuaded others from undertaking their own projects, so we’re proposing to remove that requirement and allow the homeowners to determine whether to include the shared party wall in a project. 

2. Remove the current “on all elevations” language. A current stipulation states “that units replace the siding on all elevations … at the same time with the same material.” The reason for this proposed change is that the high cost of HardiePlank is a deterrent for owners who want to use HardiePlank but don’t want to spend the money to install it on their entire house when only one side needs to be replaced (the typical situation for our homes, which have one side facing the lake or the woods). 

3. Specify HardiePlank colors that can be used. Projects to install HardiePlank siding in Monterey Taupe and HardieTrim in Sailcloth have been approved by the DRB for two Lakeport homes assigned to color palette 1 and for two homes assigned to color palette 2. Three other applications have been submitted but not yet approved, and all plan to use these colors.

In order to be consistent with these DRB approvals, the board is proposing that all HardiePlank installations, regardless of color palette, use the same Monterey Taupe siding and Sailcloth trim. Although using the same Hardie siding and trim colors for both palettes is a departure from the existing color scheme, the Board believes this is the best choice to minimize the color differences between homes with existing cedar and new HardiePlank siding. Because projects have already been approved, the Board determined that though this may not be the ideal solution, all alternatives have more significant disadvantages.

For the sake of comparison, you can see homes with the Monterey Taupe siding and Sailcloth trim compared to both color palettes at these locations:

  • Palette 1 (Monterey Gray, Amber White): 1919 and 1923 Lakeport 
  • Palette 2 (Beachwood, Wheat): 1964 and 1971 Lakeport

A survey was sent to Lakeport owners on October 23 (with follow-ups on November 4 and 10), and results will be shared soon. The Board’s consensus is that these changes will be improvements for homeowners who are replacing their siding with HardiePlank and for their adjacent neighbors. 

If you have any questions about design standards, please email Kelly Driscoll (11100 Lakespray) at kmdriscoll@outlook.com. We are always open to recommendations on how the design standards can be improved. In addition, please be sure to consult Lakeport standards at http://lakeportcluster.blogspot.com/p/cluster-stand4 and ards.html before doing any replacements or major repairs on your home—some require DRB approval.

Landscape Committee


The “big project” in the last two months was dock-related landscaping, including a dry creek and new landscaping on the hill leading down to the west end of the dock and the installation of coir logs in that area to help restore the shoreline there (thanks to coir-log volunteers: Paul Renard, Kristen Bobik, Dave Fleming, Joe Powers, Andy Powers, and Diane Zoukis). Repairs were also made to landscaping areas damaged during the dock construction, including adding some new plants, rearranging ones that were moved for the construction, and redefining the beds.

Landscaping improvements weren’t limited to the area next to the dock, however. The hedge of Japanese hollies with canker that had become an eyesore was removed, and the ground in that area will be left fallow for a year before being re-planted. Another infestation, this time of spider mites, was removed in the adjacent hedge. Furthermore, tree removal/trimming addressed issues at the entrance and along the common area on the north side of Lakespray, and more trees that overhang Lakespray homes and Lakeport streets will be trimmed in December. Unfortunately, it appears we will have to continue to deal with dying trees over the next few years, in particular those along Sunrise Valley Drive.

Possible projects for next year include storm-water mitigation (which may be eligible for a grant from the Northern Virginia Soil and Water Conservation District), new landscaping where the cankerous Japanese hollies were removed, extra mulching, a repeat of grub treatment, other special maintenance, and of course, the ongoing tree work.

If you have suggestions for needed landscape maintenance and/or enhancements, please communicate them to Landscape Committee chair Carol Leos at leosc1@aol.com.